All posts by Kelly Colligan (Shelter Island High School)

The end

Last Day on the job

Yesterday was quite the experience. Being in a newsroom for more than ten hours working on multiple projects is stressful, but rewarding. Since I filmed the footage we took at the Ducks game on Wednesday, I had the job of scripting/editing the whole thing. This is really my favorite part of it all. It’s incredible to see everything come together and you end up with such a complete project. Although this process was at times painful and overwhelming, in the end it’s all worth it.

For me, today is more of a relaxed day because I am practically done with my assignments. I think the video came out really good and I’m proud of my team for producing such a cool piece of work. I hope everyone else that sees it likes it as much as I do.

I’m really going to miss all the people I met here. At first, I was hesitant to whether I would click with any of the other students here, but now there is no doubt in my mind these people will be my friends after we leave Stony Brook. Everyone here is so open-minded and ambitious. It’s refreshing to see young people be so passionate about something, while having a blast at the same time.

I also hadn’t seen Reid since freshman year, so reuniting with him has been awesome. It’s weird how even after a long period of time, some friendships can pick up right where they left off. Plus, Lisa is now a homegirl. I really hope all of us hang out after this program and stay connected throughout high school, and even college.

I have learned so much this week that I never thought I would have. Even though some activities weren’t exactly my favorite, in the end they helped me become a more well-rounded journalist.

I’m still not exactly sure if I want to become a journalist. I think I just don’t want to restrict myself to one career just yet. Trying out all these new things has been really beneficial to me. Learning photography with Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer John Williams was such a cool opportunity. I’m excited to take these skills back to Shelter Island’s journalism program.

P.S. Hi Emma if you’re reading this. :)

 

 

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Kelly Colligan and Dan Walocha

We don’t actually work for Newsday

I had a chance to work the camera with Jacqueline. We managed to snap this quick selfie in the broadcast studio.
I had a chance to work the camera with Jacqueline. We managed to snap this quick selfie in the broadcast studio.
I can’t believe the week is already half over. Yesterday was jam-packed with ducks, cameras and good advice. The first thing we got to do was practice filming in front of a real broadcast studio. We each got our turn to play the anchor, the cameraman, floor manager, and more. Being on-camera wasn’t too much pressure, but I actually liked being at the teleprompter the most. It was really cool to see how broadcasting really works, and I loved seeing everyone laugh and have fun on camera.

Next, we visited Newsday to see the facility and talk to some journalists employed there. I was surprised at how huge the newsroom actually was. Everyone from sports writers to entertainment writers were hard at work. We even got some free t-shirts for our travels.

After visiting the newsroom, we sat down to hear some guest speakers. We listened to four or five journalists who spoke about their experiences, and how we could become better journalists. Each and every story was so inspiring and everyone seemed to genuinely love their jobs.

Following our Newsday tour, we drove straight to the Long Island Ducks game. I had never been to a Ducks game before, so I didn’t realize the amount of people that would come to support the team. Families, little league teams, couples, and loyal fans were just some of the enthusiastic fans that sat in the seats of the Bethpage Ballpark.

We got to work right away, beginning with a quick press conference with Ducks Media Relations & Broadcasting Manager Mike Polak. Everyone in the stands looked at us as we wore our green “Greene” shirts labeled “PRESS” on the back. I think the Newsday backpacks gave people a false impression that we worked for Newsday, but that was just fine to me. Once the game started, we got right to interviewing.

We interviewed about five or six fans on the rivalry between the teams, the Bridgeport Bluefish and the Ducks. It was fun filming B-roll, or background shots/action, because we got to watch all the diverse and interesting fans. The only downside was since I volunteered to film that day, I had to carry the camera, camera bag, and tripod everywhere we went.

Once we were finally finished interviewing, we left the game a little early. On the 45 minute bus ride home, we relaxed and listened to Bob Herzog talk about life as a sports writer.

After we got off the bus, we spent some time in the dorm’s recreation room, and played ping pong and pool with some of the students from the math program. Yaya and I walked up to our room like zombies, and crawled into bed to relieve ourselves of exhaustion. We woke up today again, at 6:30 a.m., and now we are blogging, at 8:37, at it again.

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Noelia Vazquez

Noelia Vazquez: Many interests, singular passion

Noelia Vazquez does it all. Aside from singing, dancing, acting, teaching and traveling, Noelia possesses a driving passion for journalism. Noelia is proud to be a part of her school newspaper, East Islip High School’s The Broadcaster. When some students from the paper spoke with her English class about joining, she ran down to her guidance counselor to sign up.

“When I see someone passionate about something, it makes me want to try that exact thing,” Noelia explained.

Everything about Noelia is social: “I genuinely just love talking to people,” she said. “I think that’s one of the things that attracted me to journalism in the first place. I wanted to interview people find out their story and share it. Just interacting with new people to me is exciting.”

Noelia recalled creating her first article, remembering how she had to interview more than 15 students and teachers on their experiences in musical conferences. After finishing that article, Noelia decided that her one of her favorite parts of journalism was interviewing people.

“I like hearing people’s stories,” Noelia said.

Later on in her journalism career, she ran into a practice that almost all journalists loathe—censorship. Noelia wanted to write an article on a controversial topic, East Islip’s school mascot, the “Redmen.”

Noelia’s idea was shut down because her journalism class, including her teacher, believed it might offend the school board and didn’t want to bring unnecessary attention to the topic.

“We are still young and limited to what we can write about,” she said. “That’s probably the most difficult part of journalism.”

Singing and dancing is also a passion for Noelia—she’s even tried out for the TV talent completion “X-Factor.” She participates in the school musical every year, and has a big appreciation for music. But performing is not the only tool in her toolbox. Noelia speaks fluent Spanish and quite a bit of Chinese. Reading is a large hobby or hers as well.

“When I go to the library I take out nine books,” Noelia said. “But I have a life, I swear!”

In addition to attending this program, she plans to stay busy. She has four jobs:  answering phones at a Chinese restaurant, working at an Italian ice place, babysitting and teaching religion. Following in her sister’s footsteps, Noelia plans to dedicate a couple years of her life to just traveling.

Noelia said she hopes these experiences expand her horizons so that her writing can make an impact, saying “I want to write pieces that make people feel.”

She recalled being approached by an underclassman whom she did not know about one of her opinion pieces on society’s rigid expectations of women. The student said she was pleasantly surprised that the newspaper was writing about issues that teenagers could relate to.

“It makes me feel good when people are positively affected after reading my articles,” Noelia said. “That’s what keeps me coming back to the idea of becoming a journalist in the future.”

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A sweaty, yet exciting adventure

Right after we finished our second broadcast class, we were told our group was to travel to the police facilities to interview and film for a new article. No time to research – no problem. Since we missed the bus, we had to walk there. This actually helped us because it bought us time to formulate some questions for our article.

As we walked the 20-30 minute route, we discussed the articles we would be writing/filming about. We were to break news regarding Stony Brook University’s new emergency operations center, and then also touch on the station’s new police cars. When we finally arrived at our destination, we were welcomed by police officers who let us into the building to speak to the Chief of Police about the school’s new emergency operations center. I was impressed to see this shiny new room adapted into what looks like a control center in crime movies.

We filmed, scribed, and snapped photos all at once, and practiced the new skills we learned from our broadcast class. Then, we moved outside to take a look at the new police interceptors. We filmed some more, and after two or three hours, we were pooped. Although we had got the job done, we were tired, thirsty, and hungry. Turns out, we missed the bus going back too, so we were forced to walk in the hot summer sun.

On the bright side, Wasim promised to stop at Starbucks and buy us cold drinks. The only problem was, when we arrived at the Starbucks, it was closed. Wasim had crushed our precious dreams. To compensate, we stopped at the SAC and got drinks there. We decided to take a post-adventure sweaty selfie. Enjoy.

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Monday madness for the Greene Team

panning your subject

Yesterday was full of photography, cartwheels, and Double Stuf Oreos. We started the day by blogging and interviewing the new Athletics Director here at Stony Brook, Shawn Heilbron. I’ve never interviewed a subject among eighteen others, so that was really interesting. Heilbron was very well spoken and enjoyable to listen to. He gave us exactly what we needed to write our article.

After lunch, we got the privilege to learn from a Pulitzer Prize-winning photographer, John Conrad Williams. After seeing what an incredible photographer he was, I was a bit intimidated. But after Williams showed us some basic skills of photography, I became more confident. We ventured out of the ice-cold newsroom, and out to take photos of the fountain, and then on to portraits. After experimenting with the camera’s ISO, shutter speed and aperture, we moved on to action shots. We jumped, cartwheeled, and leaped across the grass, while our partner tried their best to capture the shot. One of my shots came out really cool, so I inserted it into this blog post.

Following our photography lesson, we ate dinner. I decided to make instant mac & cheese in the cafeteria’s microwave. Solid choice. Once everyone had finished eating, we began our broadcast lesson. Rick Ricioppo was our instructor, and he helped us assemble the camera on the tripod, and get the most out of our videos. Towards the end of the lesson we got the chance to test out our new skills and tape some scenes outside. We filmed everything from footsteps to still nature. I’m excited to see how our (very random) movie comes out.

After a very long day, we situated into the dorms. All the girls gathered in one room to play a fun game called Scattergories. We laughed at every single response while shoveling down Double Stuf Oreos and Doritos. Party games and junk food is always a good time. After a few rounds of playing, my roommate Yaya and I went back to our room. I’m so glad Yaya is my roommate because we are so much alike. We will definitely keep in touch after this program ends. Let’s just say there’s never a dull moment in room C211.

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Blog #1: Not too shabby

I have survived the first night here at Stony Brook. My roommate, Yardalie, is so nice and a really good singer. I always mispronounce her name, so I gave her the nickname “Yaya.” She says she likes it, so it works. Last night I finally convinced Yaya and my other friend Noelia to sing. The kids here are all so talented and diverse. Last night we all ordered pizza and watched Monsters University. Despite how juvenile the movie sounds, it’s actually very entertaining. The staff here is really welcoming too.

We went to bed earlier than expected, around midnight, and woke up pretty early. Let’s just say I’m not a morning person. We made our way over to the Student Activities Center, or the SAC. I enjoyed an overwhelmingly healthy meal of Lucky Charms and a sesame bagel. We are now sitting in the (very chilly) newsroom, writing these blogs. Earlier, we researched the new Stony Brook Athletic Director. Shawn Heilbron. It feels so weird to be researching and gathering interview questions. Although it’s only been four weeks since I last did this, it feels like forever.

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