Tag Archives: Dan Walocha

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The Greene Beans team
The Greene Beans team

If anyone had asked me to accompany them to any sporting event two years ago, I probably would have laughed it off and rejected them. That is because it’s not my thing. However, going to the Ducks game last night opened my eyes to different things.

We arrived at the game an hour and half early with no story to write about. My teammates (Hanna, Dan and Madison) and I called ourselves “The Greene Beans.” We bonded to shoot videos, take pictures and interview people. Though it was nerve-racking to ask people their experience during the game since we didn’t want to be rejected—or get yelled at—it turned out to be experience that I could never forget.

I loved going to different places at the game and snapping pictures of the teams that were playing, the audience and the youth baseball leagues. Some children were so eager to be on the camera, which motivated me more. Unfortunately, we couldn’t interview all of them.

After nearly an hour and half walking around with our equipment in hand, we finally stopped to have some fun. We were later joined by Reid Rubio and Noelia Vazquez, bought tickets to go in the Ducks bouncy house and relax. This definitely made my night.  Overall, I enjoyed myself and I wish I could do it more often.

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Can work be relaxing?

 

Yaya, Madi, Dan, Me
Yaya, Madi, Dan, Me

Thursday was the day that we dedicated ourselves completely to finishing our stories. It was hard work, but it was also relaxing in a way, compared to the day before.  I worked with my group, the Greene Beans (shut up, the name is awesome), and we have grown even closer in the past couple of days. To be honest, when I met Madison, Dan and Yaya, I thought they were going to be completely different. I never imagined how funny they would be, how fast we could become friends. And that’s true for pretty much everyone on the Greene Team.

It’s hard to believe this camp is almost over. While some of it has been stressful and annoying, I have made a lot of good memories and made friendships that will hopefully last a long time.

I feel like just as I started to get used to the routine and work, the week was coming to a close. Don’t get me wrong, I miss my bed and my siblings and quality food, but it has been an overall good experience for me.

Even though I don’t plan on a future in journalism, I think that this camp has changed my overall view on jobs in general, college life and the hard work that people put in when they feel passionate about something.

That’s probably the problem—I don’t feel passionate about journalism. I love to write, but my interest veers more toward creative writing, the ability to create anything without any restrictions.

Today (Friday) was pretty much the same as Thursday. The only thing different is that for lunch, we all went into a small room, crowded around a table, and ate pizza. We all shared our comments on the camp, what we wished had happened and what we approved of. It was interesting to hear what everyone had to say, and how their opinions had changed throughout the week.

Most people had realized that they didn’t want to pursue journalism as a career, but that they appreciated all that they had learned from the camp. I think that it is still a minor possibility for me, maybe for most of us, but I just don’t think that it is for everybody, because it is so different from other professions.

Despite everything, I had a good time at this camp, and I don’t think I’ll ever forget it.

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Real journalists in real cubicles: a day of real-life experiences

Newsday cubicles. Photo Cred: Hanna Da'Mes
Newsday cubicles. Photo Cred: Hanna Da’Mes

Wednesday was probably the most eventful day out of the week so far. It began with an early breakfast as usual, and then after our morning lectures, we headed over to Newsday. We were able to see rooms full of cubicles that real journalists worked in, and we learned more about the history of both journalism and Newsday. Some people from Newsday volunteered to speak to us, telling their stories and letting us ask questions. Before the field trip, we went to a broadcast set on campus and worked the various jobs included in TV news. My favorite job was probably the sound booth.

Lisa Angell and Kayla Aponte sleeping. Photo Cred: Hanna Da'Mes
Lisa Angell and Kayla Aponte sleeping. Photo Cred: Hanna Da’Mes

Afterwards, we all got back on the bus and rode to the Ducks game. We separated into our groups and tried to figure out what we were going to write our stories on. My group, which consisted of Madison Flotteron,  Yardalie “Yaya” Daniel and Dan Walocha, wanted our story to be on the high school and college students who worked in the concession stands, but we were told later that we weren’t allowed to, so we had to settle for it being on the various groups and organizations that were attending the game. We walked around for hours, interviewing people, shooting b-roll and taking pictures for our story. After a couple of hours, we decided that we needed a break, so we went to the bouncy house, and it seemed that a little time acting like a kid was a good way to relieve stress. We quickly got back to work after eating, interviewing another baseball team and shooting some more b-roll.

It was a really long day, and the exhaustion showed as we drifted to sleep on the bus ride back to the university.

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Review: ‘May in the Summer’

“May in the Summer,” directed by Cherien Dabis, tells a cliché story of May (Dabis), a soon-to-be bride who reevaluates her life after finding out that what she wants isn’t what she needs.

Her overly religious mother, Nadine (Hiam Abbass), is the barrier between her and the perfect wedding. Her two sisters provide support for the stressed-out bride, and along the way, they grow closer, as does their appreciation for each other.

The film is properly laid out, with a less than consistent plot line, and fails to deliver smooth transitions and excitement. In the beginning, the audience is exposed to an array of events that set up the major conflict later in the film.

For instance, Dabis is seen arriving in Jordan via airplane to plan the wedding and visit her family. As suggested, the religious bumper sticker on the family car conveys a sense of constricting rule by the mother, Nadine. The car ride to the house also sets-up information the audience must know: Nadine was cheated on by her husband (now hated by Dabis and her sisters), Dabis is having communication trouble with her hubby, and the entire family seems slightly hostile towards each other. The scene cuts abruptly to the family standing in the house and eating dinner. It didn’t, in the least, contribute to the story, but it definitely built the setting.

Later on, Dabis learns that her mother will not be attending the wedding for religious purposes: the husband, Ziam (Alexander Siddig) is Muslim, but Dabis was raised as a Christian. The plot suddenly gets deeper in a short amount of time: Dabis rekindles her shriveled relationship with her dad, the mother actually still loves the dad, and the sisters encounter their own troubles regarding both sexual orientation and loyalty. Along the way, the audience could easily get confused, and a conscious effort must be made to actually keep track of what’s going on.

Eventually, Dabis realizes that her needs are not being met by Ziam, who is constantly too busy with his work to pay attention to his fiancé, and she, following in her dad’s footsteps, has an affair with a friend. The wedding gets called off as she confronts him with the conflict at hand, and the film ends with the audience wondering what becomes of the previous affair: Will she marry her friend? Will she change her mind? What becomes of Nadine and her ex-husband’s relationship? Nothing, in reality, is truly answered.

Overall, the movie had a sloppy ending and a poor story line.

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An arena broadcast with the Greene Beans

Today we worked on portraits with John Williams. He helped us with lighting and gave us tips on how to take a better photo.

Photo credits to Noelia Vazquez
Photo credits to Noelia Vazquez
Unfortunately, today was his last day with us and I know I personally will miss him.

We started working with our teams on our stories. My team will be covering the new arena that was just built at Stony Brook. It was fun meeting the basketball players and talking with the athletics director. Everyone seems enthusiastic about the new arena and has high hopes to attract new fans.

My teammates and I really enjoy working together. We decided on calling ourselves the Greene Beans. Dan Walocha was amazing at getting the right angle for our footage. Yardalie Daniel and Hanna Da’Mes got great photos of the new arena. I think our final piece will look fabulous when we finish it.

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