Tag Archives: Tarmac

End of an awesome week

Colin Maloney preparing for one of his numerous interviews at the Ducks game.
Colin Maloney preparing for one of his numerous interviews at the Ducks game.

It is the last day of the program, and I cannot believe this is the final blog post I will write. This week has been amazing. I met 18 incredible teenagers who not only share my interest in journalism but also are just incredibly fun, and I will miss them all greatly.

Besides having fun with my fellow campers, this week has been jam-packed with truly unique experiences. I got to participate press conference with Stony Brook’s Athletic Director Shawn Heilbron, learned photography from the Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist John Williams, interviewed cancer survivors and baseball fans, learned how a news broadcast is made and got to see an actual newsroom at Newsday.

The thing I most valued about this program was it made me go outside my comfort zone.  I had to interview complete strangers, which was at first absolute terrifying because working for my school newspaper Tarmac, I usually knew my interview subjects. But after several interviews, I began to relax and really enjoyed conducting the interviews.  Besides the interviewing, I also had to take and edit stills and video, which I had never had to do for my school program. But, doing all these things gave me valuable experience that I hope to use back at the Tarmac.

In closing, I would like to thank to all the professors for all the hard work they did and my fellow Greene Team members for being the funny, creative, and awesome. You guys made the week fly by and I hope to see you all again.

 

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Colin Maloney

Colin Maloney: A leader in and out of the newsroom

For Colin Maloney, a rising junior at Chaminade High School, writing has been a longtime passion.

“I’ve always been interested in writing since I was in grade school,” Colin said. “My freshman year in high school is when I got involved in journalism and joined my high school newspaper, Tarmac.”

The process of writing and editing intrigues Colin, he said.

“My favorite part about working for the Tarmac is getting the chance to come up with a story idea, investigate it and then see it through to its publication.”

But it’s not always easy, he said.

“The challenging part is, if I’m editing someone else’s work and I miss something, it’s my fault now, not the writer’s,” Colin said. “The way I handle it is just to take my time and be very thorough.”

In addition to journalism, Colin has played basketball, practiced the trumpet and participated in student government.

He’s also an officer in his school’s Intramural Officials Club.

“We run all of the intramural sports that take place after school,” Colin said. “As an officer, I have to make sure the other refs are signed in and on time to set up all the equipment and to make sure everything’s cleaned up when it’s over.”

He’s drawn to such leadership positions, he said, because he wants to make a difference.

“I hate seeing things sloppily done. I never say it’s someone else’s problem. If something’s wrong I try to fix it,” said Colin. “My whole family is the same way. In fact, my dad has to edit contracts for a living as a lawyer and if he makes a mistake it can cost him his job so I think that’s where the thoroughness comes from.”

Colin enjoys following foreign affairs, and he said he hopes one day to be either a foreign correspondent or a State Department employee.

Participating in the Greene program is one more step along that path.

“Colin was very interested in learning to be an investigative reporter and what better place to learn those skills then the Greene Institute founded by one of the country’s best investigative reporters, Bob Greene,” said his mother, Lisa Maloney. “He appreciates the skills and efforts of journalists who are able to bring important issues affecting the world to a wide audience through their stories, often at great personal risk.”

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